Public Health Resources | The Aluminum Association

Public Health Resources

Tracking

  • Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Mapping/Tracking – Johns Hopkins provides real-time updates and geo-mapping of global coronavirus impacts on this site down the state level in the US.
  • State-Level Testing Data – This site provides daily updated information on the number of tests conducted in each state and the resulting outcomes of those tests.
  • EPA List of Effective Coronavirus Disinfectants — The EPA maintains a constantly updated list of disinfectants determined to be effective against coronavirus.  The list can be used to assess the effectiveness of products under consideration for use in industrial, residential and commercial settings. 
  • World Health Organization – The agency leading the global coronavirus response has extensive resources available at this site.
  • Center for Disease Control – The CDC is leading the U.S. response to the coronavirus outbreak and a wide spectrum of prevention, mitigation and protection information can be found on their coronavirus website.
  • Interim CDC Guidance – Interim Guidance for Implementing Safety Practices for Critical Infrastructure Workers Who May Have Had Exposure to a Person with Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19.
  • COVID-19 Projections — University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) resource that models projected impacts and timelines of COVID-19 nationally and by state.
  • Worldometer — Global tracking information of COVID-19 cases, recovery, fatalities and other measures.
  • Joint CDC, EPA Guidance — Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools and Homes

Coronavirus Survival on Aluminum Surfaces

Mental Health Resources for Employers

The Aluminum Association has compiled a list of resources for our members to ensure that employees have adequate mental health care during the COVID-19 crisis.

Close Contact Definition

The CDC announced a revision to its definition of "Close Contact" - making it explicit that the 15-minute exposure period (i.e. within 6-feet of an infected individual for 15 minutes) should be assessed based on a cumulative amount of time over 24 hours, not just s single, continuous 15-minute interaction. More on the CDC's website here.

News

October 21, 2020
Data and Modelling Show COVID-19 Disruptions Putting Downward Pressure on Industry Output, Jobs  
October 9, 2020
Commerce Department Finds Aluminum Sheet From 18 Countries Sold in U.S. at Unfairly Low Prices